Support the We the People Act, and we just might get to find out.


 

Welcome to the website of We the People Massachusetts, an all-volunteer network of citizens dedicated to the cause of democracy.  You can learn more about our organization by visiting the "about us" page.

We've been active in developing educational materials like the Fixing our Broken Democracy workshop and organizing ballot initiatives in 2012 and 2014.

We partnered with other organizations to promote passage of the We the People Act, which narrowly missed being voted out of committee for consideration by the entire House. We plan to submit a similar bill during the next legislative session.

 

 

The 2015-16 We the People Act (H.3127) did two things:

  • First, it called on Congress to propose an amendment to the U.S. Constitution asserting that
    1. the rights protected by the Constitution are the rights of natural persons, i.e. human individuals, only and
    2. Congress and the states shall place limits on political contributions and expenditures to ensure that all citizens have access to the political process, and the spending of money to influence elections is not protected free speech under the First Amendment
  • Second, if Congress failed to propose such an amendment within six months, the We the People Act put Massachusetts on record calling for a convention of the states for the purpose of proposing the amendment.

 

1. Find out whether your state representative and state senator signed on as supporters of the bill.

If you aren't sure whose district you are in, find out at malegislature.gov/People/Search, or at www.wheredoivotema.com.

Once you know who your elected officials are, check this list to see if they signed on as co-sponsors of the We the People Act.

2. If they were co-sponsors, thank them and urge them to make the We the People Act a priority.

Lawmakers sign their names onto many pieces of legislation.  That is an important first step but does not guarantee that a bill moves forward and gets a vote.  We need to keep the pressure on in order to ensure that the We the People Act is a top priority.  This means calling, emailing, writing letters - whatever you can do.  A letter to the editor of your local paper is especially effective.  Start by thanking them; a bill that earns them public praise is much more likely to stay on their radar.  After thanking them for co-sponsoring, make it clear to your elected officials that you want them to go to the mat for democracy!

If they are not co-sponsors, urge them to support the We the People Act.

As the bill moves through the legislative process, lawmakers can add their names to the existing list of supporters.  If your representative or senator has not yet signed on as a champion of democracy, it's never too late to get them on board.  Sometimes all it takes is hearing that a number of their constituents are interested in a piece of legislation.

3. Write a letter to the editor of your local paper.

Letters to the editor are a great way to raise public awareness of the We the People Act.  Just think of how many people there are who understand that our democracy is in trouble but don't know there's a solution they can support.  Your letter is the good news they've been waiting for.  If your LTE gets published, let us know!

4. Contact us to volunteer!

Use the contact us page to let us know you're interested in being a part of the democracy movement here in Massachusetts.  This website is created and maintained by local volunteers.  As the We the People Act moves through the statehouse, we will be organizing events in support of the bill.  Drop us a line, and we can let you know when there's a volunteer opportunity in your neck of the woods.

Coalition supporting the we the people act:

 

Endorsing organizations:

Acton Democratic Town Committee

Avon Democratic Town Committee

Becket Democratic Town Committee

Bellingham Democratic Town Committee

Berkshire Brigades

Beverly Democratic Town Committee

Boston Ethical Society

Boston Ward 19 Democratic Committee

Bourne Democratic Town Committee

Citizens for Economic Justice

Easthampton Democratic Town Committee

Framingham Democratic Town Committee

Franklin Democratic Town Committee

Great Barrington Democratic Town Committee

Groton Democratic Town Committee

Harwich Democratic Town Committee

Hingham Democratic Town Committee

Holliston Democratic Town Committee

Ipswich Democratic Town Committee

Lincoln Democratic Town Committee

Lincoln Town Meeting

Littleton Democratic Town Committee

Lynn Democratic City Committee

Ludlow Democratic Town Committee

Marion Democratic Town Committee

Maynard Democratic Town Committee

Melrose Democratic Committee

Methuen Democratic Town Committee

Middlesex, Norfolk, and Worcester Democratic Alliance

Milford Democratic Town Committee

Monson Democratic Town Committee

Nahant Democratic Town Committee

Newton Democratic City Committe

Norfolk Democratic Town Committee

Norwood Democratic Town Committee

North Shore Friends Meeting

Northampton Democratic City Committee

Orleans Democratic Town Committee

Partnership for Democracy & Education

Randolph Democratic Town Committee

Reading Democratic Town Committee

Royalston Democratic Town Committee

Salem Democratic City Committee

Salisbury Democratic Town Committee

Scituate Democratic Town Committee

Sharon Democratic Town Committee

Sheffield Democratic Town Committee

Shutesbury Democratic Town Committee

South Hadley Democratic Town Committee

Southampton Democratic Town Committee

Stoughton Democratic Town Committee

Stow Democratic Town Committee

Sudbury Democratic Town Committee

Sunderland Democratic Town Committee

Swampscott Democratic Town Committee

UU Mass Action Certified Working Group to Amend the Constitution

Waltham Democratic City Committee

Wareham Democratic Town Committee

Wellfleet Democratic Town Committee

West Stockbridge Democratic Town Committee

Weston Democratic Town Committee

Weymouth Democratic Town Committee

Worcester Democratic City Committee

Wrentham Democratic Town Committee